They Were Not Certain What Date To Select

“Uncertainty about Jesus’ birthday in the early third century is reflected in a disputed passage of the presbyter Hippolytus, who was banished to Sarinia by Maximinus in 235, and in an authentic statement of Clement of Alexandria. While the former favored January second, the learned Clement of Alexandria enumer- ates several dates given by the Alexandrian chronographers, notably the twenty-fifth of the Egyptian month, Pachon (May twentieth), in the twenty-eighth year of Augustus and the twenty-fourth or twenty-fifth of Pharmuthi (April eighteenth or nineteenth) of the year A.D. 1, although he favored May twentieth. This shows that no Church festival, in honor of the day, was established before the middle of the third century. Origen, at that time in a sermon, denounced the idea of keeping Jesus’ birthday like that of Pharaoh and said that only sinners such as Herod were so honored. Arnobius later similarly ridiculed giving birthdays to ‘gods.’ A Latin treatise, De pascha computus (of ca. 243), placed Jesus’ birth on March twenty-first since that was the supposed day on which God created the Sun (Gen 1:14-19), thus typifying the ‘Sun of righteousness’ as Malachi 4:2 called the expected Messiah. A century before, Polycarp, martyred in Smyrna in 155, gave the same date for the birth and baptism placing it on a Wednesday because of the creation of the Sun on that day.”—Walter Woodburn Hyde, Paganism to Christianity in the Roman Empire, 249-250.

Christmas, Easter, and Halloween

by Vance Ferrell

 

4 views

Santa vs Christ Comes in the night vs Comes as a thief in the night –> 2 Peter 3:10, 1 Thess 5:2 Dressed in white and red vs Clothed in white and red –> Rev 19:13-14, Isa 63:1-3 Brings gifts and rewar

The pagan Romans exchanged food, small statues of gods, and trinkets to one another during the winter festival. The church, in adopting the custom, declared that this is to be done on December 25. “Th

The Yule log did not come from the Bible, nor from Near Eastern paganism. It came from heathen Celtic worship practices in Britain. The Celts also worshiped the sun, and they too had a celebration at